Tue11122019

Last updateThu, 07 Nov 2019 6pm

 

Introducing – Tools for Cinema Quality Assurance

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Cinema Test Tools for the Non-Technical Manager 

Cinema Test Tools is a free resource for the cinema industry, tuned most particularly for the non-technical manager. The tools include several DCPs, all with interesting means of testing the sound and picture quality for the interested by lightly trained staff. The lessons on sound and light are written to provide a foundation to communicate with the technician who must respond quickly and well to the information that they discover.

The key is a free Online Managers Online Walk Through Checklist that correlates with the many DCPs. It helps bring an understanding of the many nuances of the auditorium's situation in a straightforward way. 

CGI, X'Y'Z' to P3, there are so many things going on. Here's the news.

Confusing Definitions – Home and Away | Dolby Vision 4 and More

Hollywood SMPTE event on Wednesday, 25 September featured the Transition to Wide Color Gamut and The LA Colorist Meetup had an event on Thursday 26 September that covered the same topic with two panelists describing tools and theories of how to get there...and all the mysteries were uncovered. They weren't solved, of course, but uncovered nonetheless. 

 And if the cinema exhibition side of the business thinks there is technology confusion in their field, they haven't looked into the consumer side well enough. The technology and rollout is rife with confusing nomenclature and mismatches, just as it was 4 years ago when their version of 'better bits' started getting shown. And, the panelist pointed out, there is more to come in Post, Exhibition and the various delivery vehicles of Consumer.

Read more ...

DCI – New HDR and Direct View Display Docs

DCI has released two new documents for industry review, one dealing with emissive technology (describing them as 'often LED pixels', but leaving the door open for anything) and the other which deals with HDR – High Dynamic Range – displays in post-production and exhibition theaters "so that consistent and repeatable color quality can be achieved."

Both documents include a paragraph that begins: "This document is not a DCI Specification" plus a statement that invites review and comment and an email to send comments to, which other recent versions of these documents have done as well.

Read more ...

Swatch Out; Secret Code for SMPTE Badge

No, there is no secret code on the SMPTE badge that I can tell you about...that is for certain.

But, take this test and put your score at the bottom corner of your badge and see if anyone else does...

Pantone Color IQ Test Pantone_Color_IQ_Test

Light Illusion IBC Show Specials | Probes and Software

We are delighted to announce that in partnership with some of our hardware manufacturers we are able to offer a range of 'IBC Show special discounts' to celebrate the fact that Light Illusion has ceased attending any and all shows, as the viability they used to offer no longer applies in today's world.

The discounts will be available throughout the duration of the IBC Show, and are limited to a set number of units as defined below.
When the limited number of units has been sold, the offer for that item is over.
(For all, other than the Jeti probes, this means the offers expire at the end of play on the 19th September)

Read more ...

Ubuntu/VirtualBox setup followup

When setting up VirtualBox there are two time sinks that one can be easily get trapped by.

The first is getting an Internet connection. In theory, the Internet link of the computer that you are setting the Virtual Machine onto will be automagically linked to. Open Firefox and off you go.

Yeah; until it doesn't auto set up. Then, it is poking around until you find the right combination of not-so-obvious tricks. And here is a synopsis that I just had to find and go through, and which hopefully will save you some time.

  1. Shut down the OS. Leave VirtualBox running.
  2. Click onto the Ubuntu VM
  3. Up above or on the right panel, choose Network
  4. Click Adapter 1 and set for NAT
  5. Click Adapter 2 and set for Bridged Adapter, then select the adapter that has the link: e.g., en0, Wi-Fi (Airport)
  6. Click OK.

As long as that is open,

  1. Click on Ports
  2. Click on USB. Make certain that the USB 3.0 Controller is selected. 
  3. Click OK.
  4. When you have the Virtual Machine running, click the icon on the bottom right that looks like a USB plug. Select USB Settings 
  5. On the right side click the icon with a Plus (+) symbol on the USB Plug.
  6. Select a plugged in drive from the list. If the drive that you expect to be showing isn't showing, it may have been captured by the computers native drive system. Every Operating System is going to have a little different method for disconnecting an attached drive. Technically, it is called an UnMount. It gets a 2nd dose of complication because you can't just say 'unmount'...you must say umt (or something like that) and the name of the drive...which you probably don't know. 
  7. If you are only going to do this once in a while, go to your Disk Utility, find the drive on the list and click unmount.

At some future date, this article may be appended to include some more clues about unmounting, but this articles purpose was to get the 1st two points onto this virtual tissue.