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Last updateSat, 25 May 2019 4pm

 

Introducing – Tools for Cinema Quality Assurance

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Cinema Test Tools for the Non-Technical Manager 

Cinema Test Tools is a free resource for the cinema industry, tuned most particularly for the non-technical manager. The tools include several DCPs, all with interesting means of testing the sound and picture quality for the interested by lightly trained staff. The lessons on sound and light are written to provide a foundation to communicate with the technician who must respond quickly and well to the information that they discover.

The key is a free Online Managers Online Walk Through Checklist that correlates with the many DCPs. It helps bring an understanding of the many nuances of the auditorium's situation in a straightforward way. 

Digital Cinema Tools for Acquisition

There is a thrust for acquisition to take on some of the aspects of post. We are way to conservative for something fancy like that. But, we'll let you modern people talk about it.

You believe that Snellen eyechart or your lying eyes?

Chris Chinnock of Insight Media has tied together a group of interesting data to counter the meme that the visual acuity of the Human Visual System is incapable of discerning differences in 4K or 8K unless one is close enough to get nose oil on the screen.

Finally those who see movement flaws and dithering in 4K materials from distances supposedly impossible can stop doubting themselves, armed with science. Effects such as Film layers put over video that are composed of various forms of dithering dirt that show up on LED screens can be explained. ...– even though that addition is perhaps worthy for the 2K or 4K projection to remove the video look.

See: 8K TVs Top TV Line-ups for a Reason

For those not familiar with Chris and Insight Media, he has been assembling various focused multi-day seminars which go beyond what is typically delved into during HPA (they go into topics of the future but are not as focused on any one topic) or the NAB/IBC/ISE/CES circuits (which dance around immediately interesting topics generated from the new developments that manufacturers are showing). Nothing wrong with those, but the Insight Media sessions hit their topics from experts in with newly developed information from several tangents.      

For example, the October 2018 Display Summit held at the Harman International facility in Northridge gathered 30 experts on light field and LED technology. (It took 5 of them before I understood that there will never be a Star Wars hologram kit in my cereal box, ever. And although I have been in Barco facilities that had walls full of LED displays under test – headed to concerts, stores and exhibition displays, I was still surprised to hear a Barco/Cinionics speaker discussing LED walls for cinema.)

And here is a link for a little music to listen to while reading Chris' piece: El Panquelero - Silvia Perez Cruz & Javier Colina Trio

Update: Serif Affinity Designer and other Mac Vector Graphics Programs

While searching for a new workflow into the 4K 2020 world, the program Affinity Designer was tried. The website has a Free Trial download, and it was quickly found that the rare 16 bit TIFF export was there. Joy.

OmniGraffle doesn't have 16 bit export and they are a bit overpriced, perhaps by double. They are like the Volvo of software companies...such a great reputation that if there is any problem one thinks that it must only be happening to you. (Not that they have real problems outside of needing AI to tell the user what their Export size and detail really means and charging an extra arm for the Pro version.)

Keynote doesn't have 16-bit TIFF export and they have several other problems with exporting, regardless of how precisely great the drawing features are. For example, a 4:4:4 or 4:2:2 QuickTime export can only be done in 30 frames – which may transform well, but not perfectly and who wants the agro. Also, if you try to make a 4096 x 2160 export...well, you can't. You are limited to 3840...so, two jumbles making it hard for for cinema workflow. Not only is the TIFF export only 8-bit, but it will often mistakenly and incorrectly anti-alias a set of close single pixel white lines – close like, separated by a pixel of black, turning them into grey spectacles, I can tell they've had their fun, and ...AND, somehow, a pdf export cuts off a row or 2...very depressing. Your author wakes every morning by going to the App Store and hoping for a new version that will cleanse the taste of people who continue to say that Keynote is not meant to be a professional program...even though it is used all over the world by professionals using 4K projectors and importing into FCPX and Motion.

There are a few other programs with trial versions, most with only 8 bit per channel export, and who knows about the ones that don't. Pixelmator looked very interesting, but it is more cumbersome to work with than Affinity Designer. Autodesk has bought up iDraw and renamed it "Graphic", so maybe there is some high def hope from there soon. Perhaps Sketch has it down with 16 bit, but like most subscription-ware, no trial. Inkscape has some promise though the UI is still in flux and can't be judged. It and GIMP are open source and free, so they have a lot of interest.

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Sound Design For Film and TV –

Mel Lambert Reports from Sony Studios:

The third annual Mix Presents Sound for Film and Television conference attracted some 500 production and post pros to Sony Pictures Studios in Culver City, California, last week to hear about the art of sound design.

Subtitled “The Merging of Art, Technique and Tools,” the one-day conference kicked off with a keynote address by re-recording mixer Gary Bourgeois, followed by several panel discussions and presentations from Avid, Auro-3D, Steinberg, JBL Professional and Dolby.

During his keynote, Bourgeois advised, “Sound editors and re-recording mixers should be aware of the talent they bring to the project as storytellers. We need to explore the best ways of using technology to be creative and support the production.” He concluded with some more sage advice: “Do not let the geek take over! Instead,” he stressed, “show the passion we have for the final product.”

The rest of this Post Perspective article can be read, with pictures, at: Industry pros gather to discuss sound design for film and TV 

Sony Studios hosts Sound for Film and Television Conference

CineMontage, the Editors Guild Magazine report from Mel Lambert:

On Saturday, September 17, Mix magazine presented its third annual Sound for Film and Television conference at Sony Pictures Studios in Culver City, in cooperation with the Cinema Audio Society (CAS) and the Motion Picture Sound Editors (MPSE). This one-day event was subtitled “The Merging of Art, Technique and Tools” and included a keynote address by re-recording mixer Gary Bourgeois, CAS, panel discussions on the art of sound design, sponsored workshops hosted on the facility’s dubbing stages, and exhibits from leading technology suppliers — including Avid Technology, Auro-3D, Steinberg, JBL Professional and Dolby Laboratories.

Read the rest of this article at:

A Passion for Sound: Mix Magazine’s Annual Film & TV Conference

"Native" 3D v 2D to 3D Conversions: Pros and Cons

The aim of this blog is to provide an overview and compare 2D to 3D conversions with shooting in stereo or “native” 3D.

[Originally posted at The 3D Company: "Native” 3D versus 2D to 3D conversion: Pros and Cons | THE 3D COMPANY]

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