Wed08212019

Last updateSat, 25 May 2019 4pm

 

Introducing – Tools for Cinema Quality Assurance

cat_pr1_sm_jpg

Cinema Test Tools for the Non-Technical Manager 

Cinema Test Tools is a free resource for the cinema industry, tuned most particularly for the non-technical manager. The tools include several DCPs, all with interesting means of testing the sound and picture quality for the interested by lightly trained staff. The lessons on sound and light are written to provide a foundation to communicate with the technician who must respond quickly and well to the information that they discover.

The key is a free Online Managers Online Walk Through Checklist that correlates with the many DCPs. It helps bring an understanding of the many nuances of the auditorium's situation in a straightforward way. 

HDR Explained – for the rest of us...

Explained for camera people, but well done for all of us...

Michael Cioni and Aaron Kroger of Panavision pretend that they are uniquely qualified to explain HDR because they aren't PhD graduates – which somehow equates to being simpletons who tripped into their senior management jobs. Yet, they have scrapped together a wonderfully scrappy explanation of HDRs nuance. Fun, rarely obtuse and hijacks ensue, as the movie plug often says.HDR Explained Expertly

From the cinema exhibition view, it is getting more difficult to explain why the big screen pictures are a better quality experience for watching movies than the experience at home. The industry has never done well at explaining the differences, so it is nice to see a good attempt to explain the groundwork of what is obviously coming. One remembers the 2007 NAB/SMPTE Digital Cinema Summit when Chris Cookson, then chief technology officer for Warner Bros. explained why at all costs producers should insist on 4K deliverables if they had any respect for their future library.

In this case, the potential for getting HDR to the home is now here. With all the 4K televisions walking out of CostCo and BestBuy, and more data streaming into people's home, it has a chance. We will see what CinemaCon brings this spring...perhaps the tech won't embarrass us like it did last year.